Think before you post: the importance of social media and employment

You know what they say: If you think your mother would be okay seeing it, would you post that picture of you doing a keg-stand outside your fraternity house?

If students are only looking for a good time in college that they’re looking to show off, it’s all up to them, but if they’re going to post those pictures of partying online, employers won’t be impressed.

SCSU Career Center ‘s Associate Director Andrew Dirlevson and Social Media Coordinator Paisley Reynolds both said whatever students choose to post on Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites, really does matter.

They said digital footprints are something people don’t really think about. Even if you delete everything on your account or the account itself, there’s still a presence for everyone to see, and if a hiring manager were to google your name, any embarrassing photos, statuses, and events could still come back to haunt you.

Dirlevson gave cited a statistic that 70 percent of employers will look online, although not all of them admit they look on the internet for background information. Some employers also use that one quick search to pick between two candidates that are neck and neck in the competition for getting the job.

“Keep it professional, since your employer could check it at any time. Don’t talk some smack about people,” SCSU first-year student Alexia Vearrier said.

Vearrier said since she’s “not often on [social media] and doesn’t post inappropriate content,” her social media pages are likely appropriate, but does a college freshman have the same definition of appropriate that a hiring manager has? Depends on who you ask.

Depending on the job you apply for, you might have your social media checked out more by some, and not checked at all by other employers. Employers are often just looking for potential red flags for people applying; seeking to learn more about the applicant, along with other strategic deductive reasoning. They also will look for how you interact with others, how professional or unprofessional the posts you make are and even how active you are on social media to tell if they’re on social media too much.

Employers are often just looking for potential red flags for people applying; seeking to learn more about the applicant, along with other strategic deductive reasoning. Another thing they’ll do is look at how you interact with others, determining how professional or unprofessional the posts you make are. They’ll even look at how active you are on social media to tell if they’re scrolling through posts too much.

In terms of protecting yourself from any blast from the past, you don’t want others seeing Dirlevson and Reynolds say the best way is to think it through multiple times, make it more of a professional post than a party post. Censor what you post, make it seem like you care, be responsible and thinking multiple times before posting is just a few of the main points suggested.

Employers may not actually admit they check social media of possible and already hired employees, but a lot more of them do than you might think. So think before you speak in the cyber world.

 

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