Telling The Real Stories

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Nate Fiene - page 3

Nate Fiene has 31 articles published.

Hurricane victims need more than just money

in Editorial/Opinion by

In times of great national and international disaster, no single country gives anymore in aid than the United States. We’re very charitable and compassionate people. Money isn’t everything though, and I think it’s important to rediscover that. We all have busy lives, but there are truckers dropping everything to take supplies down to the victims of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. The Red Cross is sending lots of its available manpower there. Law enforcement and other first responders are organizing item drives. Churches and other religious institutions are adopting families until homes get rebuilt. For those of you who may not know, I am an Eagle Scout. Volunteering and being a good citizen are central tenants to Scouting. In a perfect world, there would be enough volunteers to at least begin the rebuilding process in short order. Unfortunately, that’s not always the case and I don’t believe it’s the case now.…

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Alabama State Primary: What to expect in a Trump-friendly stronghold

in Editorial/Opinion/Politics by

You might be asking why you should care about Alabama, or if I have completely lost my mind talking about the potential replacement for now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a Trump-friendly state. Have I? Let me break this down for you. The President’s approval rating in Alabama is roughly 80 percent. The primary pits incumbent senator Luther Strange against former Alabama Supreme Court Justice Roy Moore. Strange has been endorsed by the President and Vice President while also being a reliable ally of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Backed by both the White House and Senate leadership, shouldn’t it be a slam dunk for Strange? Why waste precious time with this discussion? Moore has had a solid lead since the beginning of the primary over Strange. He was kicked off the Alabama Supreme Court for failing to remove the Ten Commandments off of government property after being ordered to do so by…

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Take care of your mental health!

in Editorial/Opinion by

Hello, Dear Reader! This opinion writer is happy to be back with the Chronicle and use both quick wit and dry sarcasm to entertain you while discussing otherwise-boring topics like government, society, and politics. I’ll be tickled to get to those topics later, but today I’d like to talk to you about something near and dear to me: mental health. You see, Dear Reader, I have depression. Not the sort that arises from having a bad day, or event-based depression like losing a beloved pet or dear family member, but the biochemical sort that can stay for a lifetime. I’ve had it about seven or eight years, but have only been diagnosed recently. It was terrifying for me to get evaluated because I thought mental health was supposed to be a given. I’m supposed to be able to fix myself. We all need help sometimes, from Move-In Day to Graduation…

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Is Governor Dayton wrong about the budget battle?

in Editorial/Opinion by

Besides our spray-tan-addicted Tweeter-in-Chief against basically everyone that breathes, another interesting political battle involving Governor Dayton squaring off against the Republican Minnesota Legislature has been going all summer. The battle centers around the Governor’s constitutional right to use the line-item veto the Legislature’s bills and budget funding. Ordinarily, if it was just a normal part of the budget, there would be no issue. This was not the case. On the last day of the legislative year, Governor Dayton vetoed all funding for the Legislature itself. No salaries, no reimbursements, nada. He was quickly sued by the leaders of the Minnesota House and Senate. Ordinarily, I am in favor of a strong executive, but this crosses the line. The difference between vetoing funding for, say natural resource protection and the Legislature itself is the idea of co-equal branches of government, one of the bases of our republic. To give a quick…

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Special Elections: Definitely Need to Pay Attention

in Opinion by

Two weeks ago, in the Kansas 4th Congressional District, a Democrat came within seven points of winning. This week, Democrat Jon Ossoff narrowly avoided winning outright in the jungle primary for the 6th Congressional District in Georgia, getting 48.1% of the vote. I’m sure you’re wondering what the point is. That’s an excellent question, and with President Trump in office, one that deserves our attention. The president’s party almost always loses seats in the midterm elections. That’s one of the closest things to an iron law we have in American politics. In the last 95 years, there have only been two midterm elections where the president’s party has gained seats: 2002 and 1926. Not even FDR or Reagan were immune to this. The reason why I singled out those two elections, outside from the fact that they are the first ones this year, is the degree of competitiveness in ruby-red…

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Free speech is under assault in Minnesota

in Opinion/Politics by

In civics and history classes in our Republic, we hear the same stories so much that some of us just tune out completely, we end up forgetting things. As for myself, I lapped it all up. Civics, history, political theory, the question of citizenship, all of those are like drugs to me. I recently purchased a copy of the Federalist Papers, which I know will relegate me to “nerdy political junkie” status for the rest of my life, and I am more than happy to own up to it. In those same stories we hear, the buildup to the Revolution goes something like this: King George taxes the colonists. Colonists say “no taxation without representation.” King George and Prime Minister North said, “eat my shorts” and enacted the Intolerable Acts. Boston Massacre. Lexington and Concord. Bunker Hill. War. Declaration of Independence. America wins, the end. What’s lost but so very…

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DFL Leader Takes A Stand For Justice

in Opinion by

Rep. Melissa Hortman has been garnering quite a few kudos from left-leaning publications, citizens of color groups, and the progressive wing of the Democratic Party over her comments a few weeks ago when she said (ironically) that she was, “sorry to break up the white male poker game.” The comment was made during a debate about the criminalization of free speech bill that Rep. Nick Zweras authored, which would permit police agencies to sue protesters to recover the costs of having officers stationed at a site. After a speech made by Rep. Ilhan Omar, Hortman noticed that several members of the Minnesota House were not in attendance. Rep. Bob Dettmer demanded that Hortman apologize, but she refused. Rather, she pointed out each and every woman of color that made a speech on the issue and stated that she was tired of seeing them ignored when the white men went to…

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Time for SCSU to transition to a Self-Op

in Opinion by

Good food, high quality for cost, and great management. These are things that would never be applied to Garvey Commons under Sudexo or Chartwells except on “Opposite Day.” I have an unlimited meal pass for Garvey, strictly because of convenience, and I can guarantee that I will not get it next year. I want to make this abundantly clear: I am not blaming the student workers at Garvey Commons. They have to put up with demanding student-customers, oppressive management, and doing the best they can under a lot of pressure. Failure begins at the top with on-site management and more often than not, it is the front-line workers who suffer. Secondly, I am not expecting a five-star, twelve-course meal. I am, however, expecting a reasonable quality of food. Part of the reason why I chose to purchase my meal plan at Garvey Commons was because of the big hype around…

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Education should be a guaranteed right. Period.

in Opinion by

The time has come for education to be treated as a right. Period. The idea that higher education is simply for those who can afford it is decidedly not just, fair, or good for our democracy. You see, friends and fellow citizens, we all agree that K-12 education is good. We all agree that preschool is good. Many, many of us agree that trade schools, community colleges, and universities are good. The question becomes, then, why is it that those who choose to go onto trade schools, community colleges, and universities must place themselves in debt in excess of a year’s salary at a minimum? It’s illogical. Minnesota and my home state of Wisconsin aren’t that different. We value hard work, personal responsibility, neighborliness, self-reliance and education, among other things. Lately, however, both of our great states have dropped the ball. According to the Institute of College Access, in 2014,…

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