Telling The Real Stories

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Nate Fiene - page 2

Nate Fiene has 31 articles published.

Unpaid Internships are slavery

in Editorial/Opinion by

Many of us have had to work internships before, the vast number of which were unpaid. For me, it was a requirement for my Master’s and a way to gain valuable experience. There’s nothing wrong with requiring internships for graduation or to gain experience. I would argue that they are a vital part to bridging the academic portion of our studies to the real-world perspectives. The issue is nearly all of these internships are unpaid. The definition of slavery in the strictest sense is the buying and selling of people. Applying this to the student-employer relationship, it’s exploiting student labor without compensation. You see, Dear Reader, by forcing students to get internships, there’s no incentive for businesses to pay them. Laws on the books are lax in this regard because students don’t vote as much as older and richer members of society. As such, this is very low on the…

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Why Mueller’s investigation must continue

in Editorial/Opinion/Politics by

In recent days, several Republicans in the House and Senate have come forward and said that special counsel Bob Mueller’s investigation should be cut off because of the lack of indictments, political hit jobs, and secret nature of things. Democrats, on the other hand, want to protect Mueller. Let’s take these on point-by-point. The first indictments are coming down on Monday, including Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort. This is not a political hit job; this is an effort to make certain that the President and his top advisers did not engage in collusion with Moscow. If they did, then they should be tried and convicted. Thirdly, this isn’t secret. The ongoing investigations are being reported on, even if all the facts aren’t released yet. Any defendants will be tried openly through the legal process. It should also be noted that when Kenneth Starr investigated President Clinton, Democrats were calling for…

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Puerto Rico and poverty: how joining the U.S. could help

in Editorial/Opinion by

A lot of much-needed publicity has come to Puerto Rico following President Trump’s trip there. Needless to say, there was quite a bit of mockery with the President blaming Puerto Rico for “blowing up” the U.S. budget, shooting paper towels to citizens like they were basketballs, and not seeming to believe that water purification tablets actually worked. At the Chronicle, we pride ourselves in going under just the surface layer, and while I am definitely no fan of Trump’s, I’d rather contribute something to a legitimate conversation than repeatedly blast our Orange-In-Chief and be a part of the noise.  You see, Dear Reader, there are differences between U.S. states, Puerto Rico, and U.S. territories. Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands are commonwealths, but Guam, American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands are territories. These places are indirectly represented by Congress by having a Delegate in the House which may…

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Senate picks are happening way too early

in Editorial/Opinion by

I’m sorry, I couldn’t resist. The Alabama Senate Race has gotten me thinking of how the midterms might shape up. It’s essentially a law of American politics that the midterms are a referendum on the President’s job performance. With many scandals and low favorability ratings for both Republicans in Congress and President Trump, some Democrats are talking about their admittedly slim chances to reclaim the House and Senate. This is an article about the seats most in danger this upcoming midterm election.  1: Jeff Flake (R-AZ)  Flake has never been loved by the Republicans in Arizona. He talked tough in 2012 on a tea party-esque platform, but now also published a book attacking President Trump. He did not like the President at all and has been a critic of him. His primary opponent, Dr. Kelli Ward, has been endorsed by President Trump and has led in nearly every poll since…

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Tax policy is a huge snooze-fest, but also really important

in Editorial/Opinion/Politics by

Especially among Republicans, you hear the promise of cutting taxes and making government run more efficiently, like a business. Democrats typically talk about making the wealthy pay their “fair share.” For the first time in sixty years, the President is trying to fundamentally change tax policy. I would love to spend pages upon pages critiquing President Trump’s tax policy proposal, but unfortunately, there isn’t much of a proposal to go off of. The President has said he wants to drop the corporate tax rate down to 20 percent, then 15 percent, continuously flip-flopping. He wants to cut the “pass-through” businesses, which includes mom-and-pop shops, law firms, and real estate development. Investments will be able to be deducted immediately, something that will help the economy. So if you’re rich, you’re fine. What about the poor and middle class? You see, these tax cuts may benefit a few middle-class families, but the…

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Looking to get out of your comfort zone? Try a board game!

in Editorial/Opinion by

College is arguably the best societal once-in-a-lifetime experience, even for graduate students like me. If there’s one thing I have come to understand, it’s that we need to make the most of it, expand horizons, and get out of our comfort zones. For some of you, that may be meeting people.  For others, it could be athletics. For me, it was putting down my Xbox controller and kicking it with some classics. Below, in order, are my top five non-electronic games to play while in college (at least once):  #5: Monopoly  Timeless, classic, and a great way to see your friends absolutely lose it. Few games can touch Monopoly’s combination of skill, luck, and spite. If you haven’t played it in ages, take a Saturday or Sunday to remember why it is affectionately nicknamed “The Friendship-Killing Game”.   #4: Diplomacy  Diplomacy is one of the toughest games you’ve never heard of.…

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Repealing and replacing Obamacare… here we go again

in Editorial/Opinion/Politics by

The Republican Party last week trotted out their latest attempt to give a tax break to their corporatist masters in the form of the Graham-Cassidy Bill. This was the latest attempt to roll back Obamacare and weaken the current healthcare system as it stands today. In the Trump Administration, preserving the current status quo is the best average Americans can hope for. The Graham-Cassidy bill would have essentially punished the 31 states that have already expanded coverage under the marketplace. By taking the same pot of money allocated for those states and spreading it to all fifty, this would decrease the funds available for families already struggling. Beyond simply moving money around, it would have essentially ended the marketplace itself. Even more revolting, it would have permitted insurance companies to sell plans that don’t meet federal requirements to sick people and charge them more for those preexisting conditions. This included…

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Taking a glance at NFC predictions, Packers in control

in Editorial/Opinion by

Hey, everyone! I know that you usually tune in for my political/social commentary (by the way, the Chronicle has blessed me with a new column, named “Freedom and Fiene” and I can’t wait to sink into it!), but I am a huge Cheesehead. With the NFL kicking off this weekend, I wanted to give a sneak peek into my expectations for the Black and Blue Division. Green Bay Packers (13-3) With the #1 quarterback in the league, the Packers stand to make another Super Bowl run. The additions of cornerback Davon House and rookie cornerback Kevin King bring a much-needed boost to the league’s 31st-ranked pass defense. 3 rookie running backs join Ty Montgomery in the backfield, with Jamaal Williams looking to be the change-of-pace back. Martellus Bennet and Lance Kendricks more than compensate for Jared Cook, lost to free agency. Despite scares from Minnesota and Detroit in their home…

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Online classes need significant overhaul

in Editorial/Opinion by

One big critique of the government is it’s inefficient. There’s a duplication of resources, delays in responses and other frustrating features. Those are legitimate criticisms. No organization, public or private is perfect.   The public university system in the United States is competing with itself, not just state-to-state, but intrastate for students. In a bid to become more competitive and efficient, online learning has exploded in recent years, including the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay (my alma mater) and St. Cloud State University. Unfortunately, online learning lags behind traditional classroom learning in a big way.  However, there are benefits to online learning. It has freed up a significant number of students to achieve postsecondary education for the first time. It has democratized information. It has opened up a new web of opportunity for literally the entire world.  That being said, there are not many guides on how to run a great online…

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