Telling The Real Stories

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Nate Fiene

Nate Fiene has 30 articles published.

Congrats filthy rich, you win again! A breakdown of Trump’s budget proposal

in Editorial/Opinion by

Ladies and Gentlemen of the top 1 percent, congratulations! You’ve won and crushed both the middle and lower classes in a single swoop in the new Trump-Republican budget proposal! Such great components include: cutting the corporate tax rate, ending the individual mandate in Obamacare/Affordable Care Act, taxing college students even more, and raising the middle and poor class’s taxes for the billionaire donor class.  Obviously, this isn’t good for average Americans. To illustrate this point, graduate students like me usually get part of our tuition waived, so it’s basically a “free” couple of credits. This makes a huge impact on the affordability of postgraduate education as a whole. Under this new budget proposal, graduate students will have to count these “free” credits as income. So for me, I will go from being taxed at about 10,000 dollars to around 20,000 dollars. Of course, the more expensive places, like Harvard, a…

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Alabama giving Democrats hope: Did I hear that right?

in Editorial/Opinion by

It seems like an eternity ago where the first allegations about Roy Moore and his sexual misconduct/sexual assault of teens broke by the Washington Post. So far, at least eight women have come out and made these allegations, the oldest of which was 22 at the time. National Republicans have said they believe the women and are calling for Moore to step down. Thus far, he’s steadfastly refused, calling the women “liars,” these stories “plots by the Devil,” and blaming “a liberal media unfairly persecuting” him.  Moore has wrapped himself up in perversions of Holy Scripture to justify how he acted to girls as young as 14 when he was in his 30s. As a Christian, I find this to be disgusting and beyond the pale. It’s evil. It is obvious Jesus intended for men to treat women with respect. This shouldn’t have to be discussed.  Alabama evangelical voters face…

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Sexual harassment ethics test: Is there a solution?

in Editorial/Opinion by

Obviously, sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual misconduct, and the crimes of powerful men have been in the press recently. From Donald Trump, Harvey Weinstein, Roy Moore and now Al Franken, a national conversation is in the works about these things. It’s long overdue and incredibly necessary. I’m going to be focusing on the latter two. What Roy Moore has done is beyond disgusting and flat-out evil. Calling 14-year-olds out of math class to proposition them on dates, hitting on similarly-aged girls at the mall (their place of employment) while in his thirties is horrific. I don’t have enough adjectives for this. Roy Moore doesn’t have enough bleach to wipe this stain from his soul. It’s sickening that he wraps himself in Holy Scripture to try and justify his actions. Sen. Al Franken inappropriately touched a woman on her rear end at an event at the Minnesota State Fair. Before that,…

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Why you should be concerned about the fate of Net Neutrality

in Editorial/Opinion by

Net Neutrality is the psychotic idea that all content should be treated equally and Internet Service Providers can’t slow down a site just because they don’t like the content or aren’t willing to pay more money. Crazy, I know. Unfortunately, our FCC regulators look like they are poised to side with big corporations by voting on discontinuing the Net Neutrality rules on December 14th. Long story short: if you love your country, free porn, and/or free social media, contact the FCC at 1-888-255-5322 or at gofccyourself.com (thanks to John Oliver and the folks at Last Week Tonight), which takes you to their comment section. This is such an unpopular move that even several ISPs are against it. The few that are in favor of it say that they will be able to deliver faster and cheaper internet access to subscribers. These claims have not been evaluated. I would doubt anything…

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Minneapolis, your vote counts!

in Editorial/Opinion/Politics by

Local elections are the most underappreciated devotions to citizenship in the United States. Nationally, only about five percent of the voting population participates in these elections and the Twin Cities are hosting theirs tomorrow so I’m willing to bet many of my fellow student-citizens have a vested interest in this mayoral race. I must admit, I have not done my duty in keeping the Chronicle’s readers focused on these local races despite their importance. In my defense, Donald Trump is the President.  The vast majority of governance happens at the local level. Zoning, affordable housing, sidewalks, road repair, and dozens of other government activities are overwhelmingly or exclusively local government actions. Politico ran a story last week about the discrepancy between what mayors believe Millennials want versus what Millennials actually need. The number one need for our generation, according to this survey, was affordable housing. I want to give a…

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The Midterm Barometer: How New Jersey and Virginia can set the stage for 2018 elections

in Editorial/Opinion by

I know midterms aren’t for another year. I’m sorry, I can’t resist. The reason I point this out is that Virginia and New Jersey have their gubernatorial elections, while the Utah 3rd District is up for grabs. Recently, I’ve written articles about Alabama and early projections, but Virginia, and to a lesser extent New Jersey, are bellwether states that usually give an indicator as to how well parties may do in the midterms.  I would like to stress that reading too much into these races is foolhardy. These are not standalone elections but should be read as part of the grand narrative that 2017 special elections have written. Democrats have outperformed their polling averages by about eight percentage points. Currently, the Real Clear Politics polling average has Lt. Governor Northam defeating challenger Ed Gillespie by two points in Virginia, while challenger Phil Murphy is crushing Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno by…

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Trouble in Paradise: What St. Cloud can do to improve on-campus housing

in Editorial/Opinion by

I’m not really one for “rant pieces”. The long, not entirely sensible, Facebook-esque pieces that don’t contribute to the public discussion, but seem to exist only for the narrow echo chamber do not count as journalism in my book. That being said, I would like to point out two large problems I see around campus.  The first is the absolutely disgusting housing for students living off campus. I have toured several Universities in three different states and in each of them, the few blocks surrounding campus were the safest and most beautiful parts of the city. This is not the case in St. Cloud. The various state of disrepair, chipping paint, and poor lighting scream apathy.   Obviously, students and renters could do more to pick up places around their homes. Structural problems, bad paint, and other things of that nature are the fault of the landlords. The permissiveness in allowing…

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Why Gerrymandering creates political discrimination

in Editorial/Opinion/Politics by

Gerrymandering is the most useful tool for ensuring the continuation of political power. It turned my home state of Wisconsin from a blue-ish purple state into a ruby-red one, especially at the state level. Talking as a Democrat (a lover as Democracy, not a member of the Democratic Party), I see it as the biggest threat to our Republic. Every ten years, we have to take a census of the population. Based on who is accounted for, a state is awarded a number of Congressional seats. This is the same where each state redraws its legislative boundaries. Gerrymandering, in the broadest of terms, is to maximize the power of one party over the other for the next decade. The Supreme Court has struck down gerrymandering based on race in several different cases. The reasoning behind the Court’s decisions was the 14th Amendment: Equal Protection. By deliberately packing minority voters into…

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Unpaid Internships are slavery

in Editorial/Opinion by

Many of us have had to work internships before, the vast number of which were unpaid. For me, it was a requirement for my Master’s and a way to gain valuable experience. There’s nothing wrong with requiring internships for graduation or to gain experience. I would argue that they are a vital part to bridging the academic portion of our studies to the real-world perspectives. The issue is nearly all of these internships are unpaid. The definition of slavery in the strictest sense is the buying and selling of people. Applying this to the student-employer relationship, it’s exploiting student labor without compensation. You see, Dear Reader, by forcing students to get internships, there’s no incentive for businesses to pay them. Laws on the books are lax in this regard because students don’t vote as much as older and richer members of society. As such, this is very low on the…

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