Telling The Real Stories

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Nate Fiene

Nate Fiene has 33 articles published.

Government shutdown or government showdown?

in Opinion by

Last week, the federal government shut down for about two and a half days because  Senate Democrats, Senate Republicans, and the Doofus-in-Chief were unable to come together about a variety of issues, including parity for defense and non-defense spending, border security, and the plight of the Dreamers. The President took about a half-dozen different viewpoints on these issues, including diametrically opposed positions on immigration alone. In his negotiations with Senate and House leaders, he stated “I’ll take the heat….Send a bill to me and I’ll sign it.” Unfortunately, Donald forgot what Tuesday Donald said. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer spent hours with President Trump on Friday, trying to find some common ground for a compromise, but was ultimately unable to reach a satisfactory conclusion. The government shut down that Friday at midnight Eastern Time. It would reopen on Monday based on a Continuing Resolution, which kept government funding constant based…

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Trump and Obstruction of Justice… Are we nearing the end?

in Editorial/Opinion by

I can’t hold back any longer. I have deliberately held back from discussing the ongoing investigation into the President by Special Counselor Robert Mueller in any particular depth because there have been so many other things going on and this investigation is the least of my concerns. Alabama or any number of other things happening at the Federal level are much more important to me. Now, with a report being released that Trump wanted to fire the Special Counsel, I believe that we must speak candidly of this matter. The appointment of Special Counsel Robert Mueller occurred after the President fired FBI James Comey. The President admitted he fired Comey over the Russia investigation in an interview with Lester Holt. That confession stunned the world and made Deputy Director Rod Rosenstein hire Mueller. Since Mueller’s appointment, he has pursued key members of the Trump presidential campaign, including Paul Manafort, for…

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Minnesota Vikings: Destiny?

in Sports Columns by

As many of you know, I am a hardcore Packer-backer and member of the Cheesehead Nation. I wear my Packers uniforms on campus along with my cheesehead. I was devastated by Aaron Rodgers’ injury against the Vikings, but in the Packers-less playoffs, I don’t have a problem rooting for the Vikings. This just means we have a chance to beat the Super Bowl champs twice! I’m writing this article less than an hour after the end of the game and I still cannot believe that Minnesota pulled it off. I am simply in awe. With this victory, the Vikings have become the first ever team to advance past the Divisional Round when the Super Bowl is in their home field. Next week, we go to a Carson Wentz-less Philadelphia Eagles. If you check my season preview at the beginning of the year, I didn’t give Minnesota much of a chance,…

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Congrats filthy rich, you win again! A breakdown of Trump’s budget proposal

in Editorial/Opinion by

Ladies and Gentlemen of the top 1 percent, congratulations! You’ve won and crushed both the middle and lower classes in a single swoop in the new Trump-Republican budget proposal! Such great components include: cutting the corporate tax rate, ending the individual mandate in Obamacare/Affordable Care Act, taxing college students even more, and raising the middle and poor class’s taxes for the billionaire donor class.  Obviously, this isn’t good for average Americans. To illustrate this point, graduate students like me usually get part of our tuition waived, so it’s basically a “free” couple of credits. This makes a huge impact on the affordability of postgraduate education as a whole. Under this new budget proposal, graduate students will have to count these “free” credits as income. So for me, I will go from being taxed at about 10,000 dollars to around 20,000 dollars. Of course, the more expensive places, like Harvard, a…

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Alabama giving Democrats hope: Did I hear that right?

in Editorial/Opinion by

It seems like an eternity ago where the first allegations about Roy Moore and his sexual misconduct/sexual assault of teens broke by the Washington Post. So far, at least eight women have come out and made these allegations, the oldest of which was 22 at the time. National Republicans have said they believe the women and are calling for Moore to step down. Thus far, he’s steadfastly refused, calling the women “liars,” these stories “plots by the Devil,” and blaming “a liberal media unfairly persecuting” him.  Moore has wrapped himself up in perversions of Holy Scripture to justify how he acted to girls as young as 14 when he was in his 30s. As a Christian, I find this to be disgusting and beyond the pale. It’s evil. It is obvious Jesus intended for men to treat women with respect. This shouldn’t have to be discussed.  Alabama evangelical voters face…

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Sexual harassment ethics test: Is there a solution?

in Editorial/Opinion by

Obviously, sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual misconduct, and the crimes of powerful men have been in the press recently. From Donald Trump, Harvey Weinstein, Roy Moore and now Al Franken, a national conversation is in the works about these things. It’s long overdue and incredibly necessary. I’m going to be focusing on the latter two. What Roy Moore has done is beyond disgusting and flat-out evil. Calling 14-year-olds out of math class to proposition them on dates, hitting on similarly-aged girls at the mall (their place of employment) while in his thirties is horrific. I don’t have enough adjectives for this. Roy Moore doesn’t have enough bleach to wipe this stain from his soul. It’s sickening that he wraps himself in Holy Scripture to try and justify his actions. Sen. Al Franken inappropriately touched a woman on her rear end at an event at the Minnesota State Fair. Before that,…

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Why you should be concerned about the fate of Net Neutrality

in Editorial/Opinion by

Net Neutrality is the psychotic idea that all content should be treated equally and Internet Service Providers can’t slow down a site just because they don’t like the content or aren’t willing to pay more money. Crazy, I know. Unfortunately, our FCC regulators look like they are poised to side with big corporations by voting on discontinuing the Net Neutrality rules on December 14th. Long story short: if you love your country, free porn, and/or free social media, contact the FCC at 1-888-255-5322 or at gofccyourself.com (thanks to John Oliver and the folks at Last Week Tonight), which takes you to their comment section. This is such an unpopular move that even several ISPs are against it. The few that are in favor of it say that they will be able to deliver faster and cheaper internet access to subscribers. These claims have not been evaluated. I would doubt anything…

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Minneapolis, your vote counts!

in Editorial/Opinion/Politics by

Local elections are the most underappreciated devotions to citizenship in the United States. Nationally, only about five percent of the voting population participates in these elections and the Twin Cities are hosting theirs tomorrow so I’m willing to bet many of my fellow student-citizens have a vested interest in this mayoral race. I must admit, I have not done my duty in keeping the Chronicle’s readers focused on these local races despite their importance. In my defense, Donald Trump is the President.  The vast majority of governance happens at the local level. Zoning, affordable housing, sidewalks, road repair, and dozens of other government activities are overwhelmingly or exclusively local government actions. Politico ran a story last week about the discrepancy between what mayors believe Millennials want versus what Millennials actually need. The number one need for our generation, according to this survey, was affordable housing. I want to give a…

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The Midterm Barometer: How New Jersey and Virginia can set the stage for 2018 elections

in Editorial/Opinion by

I know midterms aren’t for another year. I’m sorry, I can’t resist. The reason I point this out is that Virginia and New Jersey have their gubernatorial elections, while the Utah 3rd District is up for grabs. Recently, I’ve written articles about Alabama and early projections, but Virginia, and to a lesser extent New Jersey, are bellwether states that usually give an indicator as to how well parties may do in the midterms.  I would like to stress that reading too much into these races is foolhardy. These are not standalone elections but should be read as part of the grand narrative that 2017 special elections have written. Democrats have outperformed their polling averages by about eight percentage points. Currently, the Real Clear Politics polling average has Lt. Governor Northam defeating challenger Ed Gillespie by two points in Virginia, while challenger Phil Murphy is crushing Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno by…

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