Telling The Real Stories

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Cody Poirier

Cody Poirier has 41 articles published.

Review in: Just Disappointment League

in Lifestyle/Movies/Reviews by
Image courtesy of Warner Brothers

Justice League was a critical point film. After the release of Wonder Woman, Warner Brothers’ DC films found the perfect turning point to relieve themselves of some of their prior filmography gaffs. The lukewarm Man of Steel, followed by the universally panned Batman V Superman, and the identity-confused Suicide Squad all combined to give DC superhero movies the earned reputation of being inferior Marvel film clones. With the release of Wonder Woman, I honestly felt they finally began how to understand the tired formula they were ripping off. It was decently paced, I liked the character development, and the only real improvements I could offer were to lose the abused slow-mo, ditch the awful CG effects, and to improve the story and dialog writing to not require so much damned exposition. I think you can figure out the reason for including a mini-review in this review if you weren’t already…

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Dead Space: A post-mortem for Visceral Games

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Dead Space was a series I was always curious about but never explored. I was a wimp when it came to horror until fairly recently, and I think I can chalk up my acclimation to it from bad horror films. I had forgotten the series existed until recent news broke about Electronic Arts dissolving the development studio of Dead Space. Late October to early November is turning out to be the period of time for EA to get another load of well deserved anger pointed at them. The death of Visceral Games (Dead Space), Acquiring Respawn Entertainment (Titanfall), and the massive controversy about Star Wars Battlefront II’s micro-transaction models and grind for a $60 game have soured my opinion of the company below the already subterranean bar it then held. This is going to be a post-mortem for the death of Visceral, a review of their claim to fame: Dead…

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Satan’s Little Helper: The method actor of madness

in Lifestyle/Lifestyle Columns/Movies/Reviews by

I find it a relieving feeling that I can continue to be surprised by my movie stack. I often buy by the title or covers alone, but I don’t remember where I managed to find this movie. Whether you believe me in saying that or not – and considering the season, I understand why – this film blindsided me with how much I enjoyed it in actuality and not in mockery or at its expense. Satan’s Little Helper is a genuinely enjoyable film and one I find hard discussing in detail like I normally do. The reason I find it hard to discuss this movie, other than it’s religiously polarizing title, is my usual style involves dissecting a movie down to core elements and going into detail why they work and don’t work. A boon for when the subject of discussion is a horrible film that has more cracks in…

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Half Past Dead: Rocking out at The Rock

in Lifestyle/Lifestyle Columns/Movies/Reviews by

Watching bad movies is a fun hobby but difficult to describe to others outright. I’ve never had success with mentioning that I liked bad movies in conversation unless whoever I was speaking to knew about MST3K; usually getting a curious look or an eye roll as a response. Thankfully, after graduating high school and learning that not everyone had the personality of a self-obsessed brick wall, I started to learn how to properly discuss my odd hobby. Nuance was the key, and coincidentally is something Half Past Dead doesn’t understand. Half Past Dead stars Steven Seagal in the role of a reputable car booster who gets caught up in a bad bust with his friend and is sent to Alcatraz 2.0. That’s right, The Rock has opened its doors again and is offering many means for incarceration, and for finality. Alcatraz houses some of the most dangerous criminals in this…

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Heat Signature: It’s fun to be bad (in space)

in Lifestyle/Reviews/Video Games by

As of late, there have been few developers on my list of enthusiastic interest. With the industry peddling out asinine games that are sometimes little other than a means to facilitate micro-transactions, unpolished messes of code, or a multiplayer only game with no community; near avoidance of the products output by the behemoths of the industry is a very reasonable notion to follow. The list I have is for quality developers, ones whose works I have played and have not seen a dramatic nosedive of quality from. Suspicious Developments, the studio behind a game I liked called Gunpoint, released Heat Signature in late September and I am glad to see that Suspicious Developments will remain on my list. Heat Signature is a game centered around growing a band of infiltrators who board spaceships for fun and profit. You will play as one of many infiltrators, their only history is related…

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Chamber Composition Concert impresses with new compositions

in Lifestyle/Performing Arts by

In my visits to PAC events, I have experienced the experimental and the positively bizarre more often than I would have ever figured. In contrast, I haven’t been to many of the rather ‘normal’ fare events for the PAC. I anticipated the Chamber Composition Concert would be a nice change of pace, and I can tell you that notion was correct. The CCC is a recital series involved with Composition and Digital Arts programs, and has performers to interact with the student conductors to give feedback on and to give life to the compositions, and teaches composers to help their performers grow with their respective instrument amongst other avenues of improvements. According to Dr. Vermillion, who also attended the recital, the concert series has been active for well over 22 years, with a recent incorporation of the Contemporary Music Ensemble dating around 2 years ago. This concert was unlike many…

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The oddity that is Immortal Redneck

in Lifestyle/Reviews/Video Games by

The concept behind Immortal Redneck likely owes its existence to substances or a fever dream. You are the titular redneck, with no given name, and find a warped reality in front of you as you exit from your sarcophagus. Mummified by a cult after a freak golf cart accident in the desert, you find yourself armed and faced with three looming pyramids. As you walk through the sandblasted courtyard of this unnamed land you are greeted by two stone sculptures, and are permitted to enter the center pyramid. At this point, you leave the only straightforward area of the game, and enter the unknown. The abandonment of straightforwardness is necessary for how the game is structured. Immortal Redneck is a Rougue-Lite game, following some of the conventions of randomized play sessions, but leaving behind complete perma-death. The gameplay of Immortal Redneck follows you ascending the pyramids and clearing out the…

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Dracula 2000: Modern missed stakes

in Lifestyle/Lifestyle Columns/Movies/Reviews by

For previous readers of this column, you may have noticed a curious similarity between this movie and one I have previously covered: Dracula 3000. While they are similar in concept, having Dracula appear in the era and year in the film’s title, but that is the furthest down the road of similarity they both will go. Dracula 2000 is set in the titular year, and was an attempt to bring Dracula into the modern era. My word choice of ‘attempt’ is very specific, for outside glances toward the film may give you the impression that it is a quality production. I will concede to the points of good set design, good supporting actors, and decent pacing of scenes. However, there is a reason the film is on the autopsy table today and I aim to dig in and find out the failing parts that ultimately relegated the film to being…

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Robot Wars: Cheesy stop-motion goodness

in Lifestyle/Lifestyle Columns/Movies/Reviews by

It bothers me greatly that giant robot movies never gained much of anything in turns of prolificacy in the west. In the land of the rising sun, giant robots are often a subcategory of various forms of media, like video games focusing on mecha, or mecha anime. All we have in the west are a variety of occasionally good mech games, and a handful of movies focused on the city dwarfing machines. “Robot Wars” is one of these movies. “Robot Wars” is a story about a much-divided planet earth. Large swaths of land are inhospitable and gas scares in years prior have condensed people into three areas of power: The North Hemi, consisting of former North American territories; the Eastern Alliance, a similar confederation of oriental countries; and the “Centros,”  a loose faction of bandits who live in the wastes and survive by pillaging. The North Hemi is in an…

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